Category Archives: Brand

Identity, perception, positioning, marketing and the like.

Around the World in 80 Min. w/Admiral Bobby Inman

Economic growth follows stability, and it flees from disorder and strife. For business purposes that matters more than the form of government.
inman
Bobby R. Inman, Admiral, U.S. Navy, (Retired). Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy

Navy Admiral, spy, technology innovator, university professor, corporate executive, board member, and savvy global investor, Bobby R. Inman is counted among the best and wisest who have held each of these titles.

Knowing the global breadth of his knowledge as it pertains to governments, societies, economies, and enterprises, we were delighted to entice him to speak at a Texas Enterprise gathering on the UT Austin campus on a topic he knows better than most, the international marketplace.

His full video remarks are worth the time, but following is a summary and partial transcript of his presentation. A few comments have been slightly reordered so that countries are appropriately grouped, but I’ve done my best to preserve his original meaning.

What do you need to find opportunity at the international marketplace?

  1. Stability. Economic growth follows stability, and it flees from disorder and strife. For business purposes that matters more than the form of government.
  2. Capital availability. What kind of investment climate do you find, and what is the tax climate? But I never saw a sound decision made purely on the basis of taxes…if there really wasn’t a solid business purpose underneath it, it turned out to be a bad outcome.
  3. Capable workforce, and an
  4. Education system that produces a capable workforce.
  5. Rule of law. If there are clear rules, regulations, and laws then its much easier to conduct business.

Continue reading Around the World in 80 Min. w/Admiral Bobby Inman

Top Five Brand and Innovation Tips From 2014

Research insights from the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin

Texas EnterpriseI work among brilliant people at the McCombs School of Business. For your benefit and mine, I keep my eyes open and watch for the big ideas that are most useful for brand builders and innovators. Here are five of the best tips gleaned from Texas Enterprise during 2014.

1. Don’t Tell Me About Your Brand, Engage With My Life

Febreze BottleProfessor Art Markman reminds us that communication is only one, and not the most important, factor in engaging consumers with a brand. “We are all lazy creatures,” he writes. “That means that [marketers] need to help customers to arrange their environments in ways that support the continued engagement with a product.” He points to a redesign of the Febreze container, designed to encourage consumers to leave the product out and visible rather than hidden away under the counter. Usage and sales increased.

2. Your Personal Brand is About Relationships, Not Just Connections

In a must-see presentation for professionals, especially those currently looking for a job, Rajiv Garg uses his research on social networks to show that the quality of your professional network will advance your career, not the size. While having hundreds of LinkedIn connections may reward your ego, when it comes to leveraging your network when you need it most, there is nothing that replaces trusted colleagues who know you well and are willing to vouch for your abilities. Garg offers three key suggestions for building your personal professional brand: Identify, Connect and Convert.

Continue reading Top Five Brand and Innovation Tips From 2014

Live from the Workshop on Social and Business Analytics

“We have to unite the art and science of marketing. The MadMen and the MathMen.”

This post was created as a live blog from the Workshop on Social and Business Analytics (#McCombsWSBA) at McCombs School of Business on March 28, 2014. I’m not a data scientist, and much of the material presented was way over my head, so I’ll apologize both to the readers and the presenters. I know I got some of this wrong, and the rest is stated in an overly simplistic way.

Perhaps I’ll pull it down later, but for now I’ll leave it up as a resource for others who attended and want to recheck their own notes.

Welcome & Logistics: Rajiv Garg, University of Texas

Rajiv Garg is a new faculty member at McCombs, in the department of Information, Risk, and Operations, and he has played a primary role as an organizer and promoter of this event. For the first workshop of this kind at the university, that I’m aware of, he has managed to assemble a stellar list of guests and attendees.

Welcome Remarks: Janet Dukerich, Sr. Vice Provost, University of Texas

Purpose of this session is to bring industry and academics together. We can produce massive amounts of data, but how we manage to make sense of this data is a critical area to explore. There are enormous policy considerations in the management of these data. 

Session 1: John S. Butler, Chair

Shyam Venugopal, Frito-Lay/Pepsico “Analytics as an Organizational Change Force”

Frito-Lay is no longer on the sidelines on how to use business analytics as a decision tool. 

You don’t have to understand every complexity of analytics. Figure out how to organize the data and the questions. The “sexy tools” aren’t going to get you anywhere. 

When the CFO leaves a company, who do key metrics and processes stay in place, but when a CMO leaves everything changes? The reason is that marketing lacks metrics and processes that reliably tie our activities to financial return in a predictable manner.

This is easier said than done, because the world is very complex. It can be quite overwhelming to get to our consumers. We have to unite the art and science of marketing. The MadMen and the MathMen.

Frito-Lay centralized our marketing decision making for all of our brands, so that what works for the individual brand must also work for the entire portfolio.  This was a difficult transition. “Toto, I don’t think we are in Kansas anymore.” Continue reading Live from the Workshop on Social and Business Analytics

Expert Advice About How and Where to Finance Your Business

“It’s like borrowing money from a mob boss—under the right set of circumstances, it can make sense.”

If you’re thinking about launching a new business there are basically three financing options available: equity, debt and bootstrapping. Choosing how and where to finance your business is no small decision–and can literally make the difference between realizing your business dreams or losing control of everything you’ve created.

In a recent interview with Rod Kurtz, Editor-at-Large with American Express OPEN Forum, serial entrepreneur and investor Rob Adams shares hard-earned insights about financing that every potential business owner should thoroughly grasp.

“What are the main types of financing available to entrepreneurs?”

The three types are equity, debt, and bootstrapping. Equity, most entrepreneurs know as venture capital. Debt, most people know as borrowing money from a bank. And bootstrapping is that the business generates enough cash from the start to not require any outside funders.

“I hear a lot about venture capital. Seems like there’s always a new startup in the news raising millions, which is obviously tempting. How do I know if it’s right for me?”

Venture capital is a form of private equity, and by definition, it means you’re selling a piece of your company. It typically applies to business models that are tech or life sciences, because they can be super high-growth and profitable, but cash-flow negative. When they’re cash-flow negative, they have no assets to collateralize, which is why it’s such a high-risk, high-reward business. And the investor owns a percentage of a higher-risk company. Regardless of urban legends, I can own one percent of your company and control 100 percent of what you do, through a concept of management rights. What I like to say, it’s like borrowing money from a mob boss—under the right set of circumstances, it can make sense, but you need to know what you’re doing.

“Debt is the one I’m most familiar with. Does this make more sense for a company like mine?”

Continue reading Expert Advice About How and Where to Finance Your Business